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tacky v.s. grippy topsheet (2)

 tacky v.s. grippy topsheet
by angora 14 years ago
Re: tacky v.s. grippy topsheet
by alphapong 14 years ago
 Re: tacky v.s. grippy topsheet
by George 14 years ago
 Re: tacky v.s. grippy topsheet
by angora 14 years ago
 Re: tacky v.s. grippy topsheet
by angora 14 years ago
 Re: tacky v.s. grippy topsheet
by alphapong 14 years ago
 Re: tacky v.s. grippy topsheet
by Daniel 14 years ago
 Re: tacky v.s. grippy topsheet
by SG 14 years ago
 Re: tacky v.s. grippy topsheet
by George 14 years ago
 Re: tacky v.s. grippy topsheet
by SG 14 years ago
 Re: tacky v.s. grippy topsheet
by George 14 years ago
 Re: tacky v.s. grippy topsheet
by cole 14 years ago
 Re: tacky v.s. grippy topsheet
by George 14 years ago
 Re: tacky v.s. grippy topsheet
by cole 14 years ago
 Re: tacky v.s. grippy topsheet
by George 14 years ago
 Re: tacky v.s. grippy topsheet
by ZoranV 14 years ago


The following message (subject: Re: tacky v.s. grippy topsheet) was posted by alphapong, on 10/26/2005 12:58:51 PM:
Spill some syrup on the floor and it is tacky. Put a rubber matt down and it is grippy. With grippy rubbers, spin is produced by the ball penetrating into the soft elastic rubber and being gripped. This is often referred to as "mechanical spin" and is strongest on strokes that allow the ball to penetrate into the rubber. For Example loops. Tacky rubbers generate spin from the sticky topsheet. With these rubbers you can often pickup a ball off a table with the stickiness. Usually tack rubbers have a firmer sponge so as to drive the ball off the tacky surface. One type is not better than the other. since each type of rubber favors a different type of stroke, you should choose the type that favors your own style. The majority of Chinese rubbers are tacky rubbers. The majority of Japanese and European rubbers are non-tacky.

Dave
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